Executive Secretary Life at KAUST, Saudi Arabia

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King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia by Rosemary Parrkaust-saudi

I recently had the opportunity to travel to King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST). This University if the vision of late King Abdullah and 7,000 people from 90 different nationalities live and work there exploring the future of science. Its a unique venture where everyone lives together in a massive compound of over 17 square miles.

It was a privilege and a pleasure to meet some of the Executive Secretaries who work there and who support the President, Professors and Directors of the University.  Global PA Training developed an Executive Secretary Programme which focused on the 21st century skills required, analysis of strengths and weaknesses, how to work productively with Leaders, Emotional Intelligence, Listening, Conflict Management, Political Intelligence, Personal Branding & Goal Setting.  Many of the Executive Secretaries have been living at Kaust a number of years enjoying a lifestyle and facilities that are out of this world.  I was driven around the campus in a golf buggy admiring the beautifully designed homes, enjoying the views of the Red Sea, visiting the Sports Centres, Restaurants and Theatre. Everyone’s needs are catered for and in this tranquil setting you can make lifelong friends, take up sports you have never tried before and learn, grow, develop and flourish!  I look forward to returning in February 2017.

Interview with www.Womanthology.com 3rd October 2016

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Interview with www.Womanthology.com
3rd October 2016

Rosemary Parr

Rosemary Parr photo

Becoming a global champion of PAs and empowering them to smash their own glass ceiling

Rosemary Parr founded the Global PA Association and Training Academy in 2006 following a career with some of the UK’s largest companies and in the UK Parliament. Over the last decade, Rosemary has established the organisation as a leader in the training and development of office professionals, travelling the world to deliver training programmes and motivational talks to managers and office professionals. The Global PA Association brings together office professionals, including executive assistants, personal assistants, secretaries and administrators from across the globe to provide networking and training opportunities, as well as supporting vital career development.

From London to New York
I trained as a personal assistant myself when I left college. I did a year’s full time study at the London Chamber of Commerce, for the Private Secretary’s Certificate. We studied business, finance, short hand (up to 120 words per minute) and we achieved advanced typing speeds etc.

Following this I went to work at the advertising agency, J Walter Thompson, where I ended up working for a Member of Parliament who was an associate director. In the end, half my salary was paid by the House of Commons and the other half was paid by J Walter Thompson. I had to go down to the Houses of Parliament every morning and we’d meet to look at the constituency post together and decide what needed to be responded to urgently. I would then be left to go back to J Walter Thompson and work from there.

After that role I went to work in New York. An agency was offering secretaries in London opportunities to work in New York so you’d receive your Green Card and they would get you temp work. So I went and lived out there for about six months and I worked as a PA at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, and also for a firm of architects. It was fun and it was a great opportunity. Some of the others stayed out in America with their Green Cards, but I went home for family reasons.

Losing it all, but finding my passion for people development
When I got married and had my children, and I didn’t work for 12 years. The reason I’m so passionate about people development is that when my children were 5, 9 and 12 we lost everything. My husband’s business failed. He wouldn’t work. We lost a beautiful five bedroomed home. We had two luxury cars in the drive and two holidays a year, and it all went down like a pack of cards.

I decided that the only way out was to pack up myself and the kids, and move on to a little rented house in a local village. We had to claim state benefits for the next seven years. Being on the floor and completely wiped out was what started my passion for people development, because I had to find that strength within myself.

I knew I had to look after the children and sort their education out. I was battling in the courts for maintenance. I was battling on many fronts. I forgot about being a PA. I didn’t know how I could cope with the hours. I was doing cleaning, bar work, waitressing and selling cosmetics. I did all of that for a while to keep us afloat.

A turning point in my life
As the children got a bit older, things got a bit easier and I thought to myself: “Come on! You were a top PA!” I wanted to get back into that, so I started some temp jobs. I ended up as a temp going into BT, and within a year I was working for the Chairman. That really was a turning point in my life. It was a huge moment.

By this time I already had a vision that I wanted to develop, motivate and inspire others, but I didn’t know how I would do it. I was very passionate about health and healing because I’d been warned that if I didn’t manage my stress levels I would get ME, so I also got into healing in order to help myself. I relied a lot on alternative therapies to help me.

Regaining my career prestige
BT was the right move because it offered prestige again working for the Chairman, so I could use that prestige and position to be able to help other people. I set up a PA network and community in BT, supported by the Chairman, Sir Christopher Bland.

We had some great networking events. We got top bosses to come and talk to the PAs about how we could work together, what they needed from their PAs etc. We then did customer facing events, inviting PAs from BT’s top customers to networking events at the BT Tower. We had Dr. Hilary Jones, the GMTV doctor to come and talk. We had Ellen McArthur, who’d just sailed around the world. We also had Will Carling, the former England Rugby captain and other celebrities. I made a lot happen.

Training as a coach
From what I started in BT I could see there was an opportunity with all of this. I’d already asked them if they would support me training as a coach, and they funded me going on an external programme, which was life-changing. I planned to stay at BT once Sir Christopher Bland retired and BT offered me another position.I was very passionate about charities, and I was they offered a role in the corporate responsibility team managing charity events. I worked with Childline and Esther Rantzen. However I discovered that my passion was also in people development and I wanted to utilise my coaching and training skills so I decided to leave BT, which was a big decision.

When I left I set up the Global PA Association. I then went back to college part time in the evenings and got my CIPD qualifications as a trainer / learning and development practitioner.

Setting up the Global PA Association to support other PAs
From the time I started the Global PA Association, literally within a couple of months I was invited to speak at a conference in Australia. I was flown out there and I was sharing the conference platform with Richard Branson’s PA, Penni Pike, who had been with him from the beginning. She’d just retired after working with him for 30 years. It was fantastic.

The Global PA Association is about supporting PAs. Typically they’re not nurtured or protected, and nobody cares about them. People just put more and more pressure, and more and more work onto them. I’ve seen this happening myself as a PA and whilst I’ve been doing lots of different temp jobs. I’ve had some rough times as well, so I felt they needed a place where they could go for support: emotional support; vocational support and career advice etc., so that’s what the Global PA Association is all about.

Professional membership and training
We offer membership and we have a code of practice for our members. We have a member’s area on our website with tools and tips, and things they can download, podcasts they can listen to. This time last year we liaised with the BBC – the World Service did a 25 minute programme on the role of the executive PA, and how vital they are.

As well as professional membership, we offer the training side. Some of our courses are already accredited by the ILM (the Institute of Learning and Management) and we’re getting the remainder accredited by the end of the year. We’ve got ILM recognised status and CPD recognised status with our courses because I want to give PAs something substantial for their CVs. We also partner with Birkbeck University on a Management Qualification for PAs.

Another nice side of it is the networking evenings and events with supplier partners. At the moment we do those in Central London.

Overseas I either go to a company who invite me in, fly me out to run an in-house programme for their company, or I work with conference and event producers in those areas who have got loads of contacts, and they would ask me to come along and run a two or three day programme for us.

My role on a day to day basis
We run courses every month, so I spend a lot of time marketing – reminding PAs that the courses are happening and what the benefits are. The rest of the time I’m developing courses for clients.

At the moment I’ve got a client in Saudia Arabia so I’m flying out there in three weeks’ time and I’m developing a programme for them. I’ll also be going to the Far East in November, working for a conference and event producer there and running some programmes for them. In between I’m holding networking evenings in London.

At the moment I’m also running our programme on Saturdays at Birkbeck. I juggle many things and I’m a real expert in multitasking!

A predominantly female role with its prestige under threat
The problem is that the role had stayed predominantly female for far too long. Research shows that it is one of the most consistently gendered occupations for women. This is why so many PAs are treated so badly.

It’s very much down to individual bosses and whether the culture of the organisation means PAs are getting recognised or not. The problem we’ve got now in the 21st century as organisations try to cut their admin costs, they are now piling the pressure on PAs to work for three, five, seven, ten people. There’s also flatter structures in organisations, so there’s a team of a lot more people – 30 or 40.

It depends what industry, but banking and accountancy are particularly going that way, so PAs are losing the prestige of their position in some organisations because they’re having to work for so many more people, and therefore it’s much harder to do a good job for anyone and their morale dips.

The research from UKCES which says that secretarial function could be under threat long term is interesting. I think we will still have PAs working for top directors on a one to one basis and we’ll have the team PAs at the bottom, but it’s that bit in the middle which is filled by lots of PAs who may be under threat job wise in the future.  I have been saying to PAs for ten years now: “You must develop your CV. You’ve got to upskill.” When I first started this I kept thinking I was ahead of my time, but not I’m sadly being proved right. It’s a real problem.

Only about 1-2% of the profession who are male. There are some male PAs out there, but it there were more I think the job role would have changed. The statistics are that men at work still earn more than women, and people listen more to the men at work.

Lack of scope for PAs to grow and develop
The problem we’ve got is that the majority of bosses are still men – not all men are awful, of course – there’s many lovely men out there. (There’s also some awful female bosses…) When bosses get a good PA they don’t want them to grow and develop, because they’re frightened they’ll leave.

I’ve seen PAs come through the Birkbeck programme who have changed jobs. I’ve had people come on my masterclasses and I’ve opened up their creativity and thought processes and given them back self belief. I’ve also seen others who go back to working saying: “It’s fantastic. I’ve learned so much. I feel supported and I can now do a better job for my boss.”

PAs are all too often not feeling valued, cherished and nourished and every time they ask to go on a training programme they’re told: “No. There’s no budget.” Companies also won’t give them a day off for training. I ran a training session in London last week and about a third of the attendees said they’d had to take a day’s holiday to be there.

Career pathways for PAs
In most organisations there’s no career pathway for PAs. The glass ceiling is very evident. There aren’t many chief of staff roles around now to progress into – those jobs have disappeared. Sometimes PAs can move into HR positions and go on to get their CIPD qualification. Other times they can move into event management in the organisation, so there are ways, but it’s up to each PA to negotiate and push themselves. A lot of PAs aren’t good at asserting themselves – they’ve got to be more proactive.

They can be their own worst enemy. Because of the nature of their role, one minute they’re being managerial, managing situations on their own. Other times they have to wait for bosses instructions, so one minute they’re proactive, the next they’re reactive. Sometimes their psyches struggle with that.

Many PAs now work flexibly, so they often work 4 days in the office and 1 day at home. It’s dependent on the culture of the organisation. Some organisations are not open to it but many have that flexibility now. For example I have one member who’s based in Birmingham but she comes down to London at least a couple of days a week to be with her manager.

It is a real mixed bag, but the public sector is often better. I have quite a few PAs from the NHS and London universities coming on our courses. Salaries are lower but PAs do get training and development opportunities, which are often denied in the private sector.

Coming up next for me and the Global PA Association
I’m off to do some training in Saudia Arabia for a university’s executive PAs, and then I’m off to Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Bangkok.

We’ve got training happening in London up to Christmas, and we’re organising some events with suppliers before Christmas. I’m busy but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

http://www.globalpa-association.com/

https://twitter.com/TheGlobalPA

https://twitter.com/rosemaryparr

https://en-gb.facebook.com/globalpaassociation/

How to Communicate Effectively as a Personal Assistant

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Carolyn Cho Blog - How to Communicate Effectively as a PA CC portrait_html_m652af9e5How to Communicate Effectively as a Personal Assistant

by Carolyn Cho

Hello.  My name is Carolyn and welcome to my first ever blog. This inaugural post is about how you as a Personal Assistant (PA) can communicate effectively. Firstly don’t underestimate how important communication is for a PA. Often you are the first point of contact for your company both internally and externally so make sure you are prepared. Keep up to date with what your company is working on, and your industry as a whole. Be aware what the media and online community are saying about your company. Know who in your organisation is working on what project, and how the various teams work together. That way you are ready to respond to any question no matter how complex or random.

Carolyn Cho Blog img2The next important thing is how you interact with other people. Effective communication is a two way process, both talking and listening. When talking, think about what you want to say and how you want it to come across. This means focusing on choice of words, the tone, volume, and pace of voice plus body language. Research has shown that the words we actually say are less important than the non-verbal communication through voice and body language. When listening be an active listener by focusing on the speaker. Consider why they are speaking to you and what outcome do they want. Are they asking you for help, or just making a comment about something? Non-verbal clues may tell you what really is being said. I like to confirm at the end of the conversation that I have understood what we have talked about by paraphrasing back what has just been told to me. Often as a PA conversations with your manager are on the hop. Don’t be scared to ask questions so you know exactly what you are expected to do. Unfortunately as a PA not all communication will be positive. Now is the time to be assertive, but not aggressive. For example someone asks you to book urgent travel asap. State firmly and calmly why you can’t do this immediately and give a good subjective reason (e.g. currently working on an urgent presentation due in half an hour). If possible offer a work around, (e.g. provide contact details of travel booker), give them an timeline of when you can undertake their request, or even delegate to someone else. Otherwise politely say no and stand your ground.

Carolyn Cho Blog img1In today’s business world online communication is a vital tool. I send and receive over 100 emails per day. But even if just sending a casual email, remember that it can be forwarded to anyone. Always be professional, keep to the point, and check spelling and grammar before sending. For clarity the main point of the email should be in the first few sentences. Keep in mind when drafting emails you are often representing your manager and the company. Social media is a powerful force that can be used for promoting yourself and your company. As a PA it connects you with peers and provides you with incredible networking opportunities. Your online profile should be professional – keep your social life private. This is your chance to advertise yourself, what skills and experience you have, and where you want your career to go. Make your profile authentic by following or commenting on areas that are of particular interest to you. For example gender pay gaps, status of the PA etc. By being active online you are communicating to a much wider audience than you could reach face-to-face. Here’s hoping it brings you a wealth of opportunities.

Leadership & motivation – how to support others and lead by example

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Leadership & motivation – how to support others and lead by example
by Amy Marsden

am001There are many definitions of “leadership”; “the action of leading a group of people or an organisation”; “the state or position of being a leader”; or, “the power or ability to lead other people”. Who are leaders? Assistants are not the typically the first group of people which spring to mind when you think of leaders – in our roles we are often instructed and sometimes considered subordinate by outsiders. Of course, within the profession we know that this is far from the truth, and the changing nature of our field heavily relies on our ability to lead and motivate others, driving results, subtly influencing change behind the scenes.

Anyone can be a leader. You do not have to be a manager, or in a position of hierarchical power to lead. One of the easiest ways for assistants to lead is to “lead by example”. Intrinsically linked to positive leadership is the ability to motivate others, and double standards or a “do as I say, not as I do” approach is bound to have a negative effect on energy levels and morale. Strong leaders think strategically and have a clear big picture vision, are supportive characters who nurture relationships and above all are effective communicators. These are all traits which good EAs/PAs possess. Below are some basic suggestions of how you can lead by your conduct and motivate others:

Strategic thinking

  • Lead through planning and information sharing. Assistants are natural leaders when it comes to thinking ahead; get dates in diaries early, create briefing packs, be proactive in asking for information upfront to keep colleagues/teams informed and explain why this is important. Encourage the people you liaise with to keep, what seem like distant future projects, on their radar and direct their attention to lead efforts.
  • Link your actions to company initiatives or align your work with a shared vision; if your company is trying to improve cost efficiency, reduce waste in your own work environment, remind your boss to try and use public transport, draft a memo about why it is helpful to take advantage of advanced train fares etc. Uphold company objectives/credos, be a shining example of your organisation’s professional standards.

Be supportive

  • Guide and support others by encouraging team work and team efforts. Demonstrate that a collective and collaborative effort is more effective than trying to amalgamate separate and disjointed operations. Offer to assist with a project, offer to take minutes at meetings and follow up on actions, schedule catch-ups and chase status updates for circulation.
  • Be kind, polite and always show respect. Office tensions can sometimes run high (especially at the top of the chain), but by remaining calm and relaxed you can try to encourage others to do the same. Refrain from exchanging cross words, and should you come up against an issue, be confident enough to address it in person in a polite yet assertive manner. Forgive your colleagues for the times that you end up on the receiving end of their bad mood or stress, move on and do not hold grudges.
  • Build and maintain relationships; take the time to get to know the people you deal with regularly, take an interest in what they do and how their role fits into the overall picture of the organisation. You never know when you may need somebody to cover your phone for an hour or two, or when you may need to ask for a one hour turnaround on a document – but never ask something of a colleague that you would not be prepared to do yourself. Lead a supportive and social culture, build rapport.

Communicate effectively

  • Lead in the way that you communicate by upholding some basic rules – if it takes longer to type than to say, pick up the phone! Go over to your colleagues desks instead of clogging up their inbox. We are all aware of how many hours are wasted going back and forth via E-mail. Hopefully your face to face approach will rub-off on other members of staff.
  • Be honest and clear. Leaders never under deliver, primarily because they manage expectations. If a task you are given is unachievable, be honest that this is the case, offer an alternative time frame and suggest other ways to move forward. Honesty commands respect. Be clear in your instructions or ask for clarity when given ambiguous instructions – this can encourage the people you work with to refine their own objectives before handing out vague directives.
  • Lead by listening. Those who shout the loudest go unheard. Listen to your colleagues before you speak and do not interrupt others. Manners have been known to be contagious!